Nestor Carbonell And Henry Ian Cusick Tease The End Of ‘Lost’

Bandar CemeThanks to Judy for the heads up.

Henry Ian Cusick and Nestor Carbonell were never going to tell a table of reporters anything about the ending of “Lost,” but in Carbonell’s case, he has a good excuse: He doesn’t know.

The show’s stars, including Cusick and Carbonell were given scripts containing 10 of 11 actors. Cusick received the 11th act, but Carbonell did not. [Yes, that’s probably a spoiler regarding the presence, or lack thereof, of Desmond and Richard Alpert in the last act of “Lost.” Perhaps. Or maybe not.]

“I never got the last act and I didn’t ask for it after because I just really want to watch it with America how it ends,” Carbonell explained at a Saturday (May 15) press day for many of the shows in the Disney-ABC empire. “I want to be surprised. I was happy with how they specifically with my character and with what I read about they resolved a lot of the dynamics of the characters. They did an amazing job and I’m looking forward to the simpulan resolution.”

Actually, there’s some confusion as to whether or not Cusick does, in fact, know how “Lost” ends.

“I think in act 11 there is a secret scene that no one got,” Cusick says. “Only the people who are in it, but nobody knows. Everyone is keeping very quiet about it.”

That’s pretty ambiguous, right?

Asking Cusick and Carbonell whether the finale will please “Lost” fans earned similarly ambiguous responses.

“What’s great about the show is that there are so many talking points,” Cusick says. “There are so many walks of life getting together to talk about the show and so many issues to be brought up and that’s exactly what the ending will bring up. People will be talking about it for weeks afterwards and that’s what the show has always done”

Adds Carbonell, “I think that’s a really good point. It has people talking about Biblical themes, mythological themes and literature, science verses religion. The big questions in life — incredible questions. At the heart of the show are these characters that they created, these really complex characters layered with so much misbehavior. No one is completely good and no one is completely evil. They are just well drawn out characters and that’s the heart of the show. I think the finale, without giving anything away, will bring some resolution to a lot of the dynamics between those characters and relationships”

Source: Full Interview @ Hitfix

Jacob And The Man In Black Are Not The Epitome Of What Lost Is

Bandar Ceme OnlineGiven all the time Lost has spent lately on Jacob (Mark Pellegrino) and the Man in Black (Terry O’Quinn), you might think they’re the key to the show or something. They’re not.

“It would be mis-categorizing to think this is the epitome of what Lost is,” executive producer Damon Lindelof tells TVGuide.com. “Obviously the island was there before these babies were born, and lots of things were going on before they came there. What those stories are isn’t relevant to the story we told, which is the crash of Oceanic 815 and what the ultimate fates of the survivors are.”

Okay, but in that case, why so much attention on the dueling brothers? Your guess is as good as ours. The penultimate episode, which Lindelof screened last week at an event in Los Angeles, still leaves plenty of questions unanswered going into the 2 ┬╜-hour finale (airing Sunday at 9/8c). Lindelof’s explanation of what to expect echoes a line Jacob delivered to the Man in Black in the Season 5 finale: “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

“I wish that we could say that the finale is going to be enormously definitive,” Lindelof says. “We found that when we told people that we’ve got definitive answers coming, it’s not as definitive as the fans want it to be, therefore there’s this ongoing and vociferous debate about what things mean.

“All we can say is: Lost is only ending once,” he adds. “There’s only one finale. There’s not a question mark at the end of the end. There’s not a dot, dot, dot. This is our story and it’s over. Hopefully there’s going to be a lot of interpretation in its wake.”

Whatever the ending, Lindelof is grateful to have made it this far, he says.

“This was a pilot where the question asked secondary to ‘What is the monster?’ was ‘How will you sustain this as a TV series?'” he says. “If I had said, ‘We’ll be fine for 120 episodes, and then we’ll end it,’ nobody ever would’ve believed it, including me. I think the show is a blessing and we’re really grateful to be here.”

How do you think Lost will end? Share your theories in the comments below.

Source: TV Guide

Latest From Fancast – May 18Th

Menang CemeDonΓÇÖt give anything specific away, but is this weekΓÇÖs ΓÇÿLostΓÇÖ a spectacular episode with lots of questions answered, or is it just so-so? ΓÇô Steven via Facebook
Spectacular is a strong word (and one typically associated with Teri Hatcher’s… comedy chops), but yeah, ‘What They Died For” is very solid. Among other things, it features, like, the best campfire story ever, a reveal about someone we thought wasn’t a candidate, and ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ finale-levels of bloodshed. There’s also a significant development regarding Jacob’s successor.

Will we see Rose and Bernard one more time before ΓÇÿLostΓÇÖ ends? ΓÇô James
Yes, in SundayΓÇÖs series finale. And when the marrieds resurface, theyΓÇÖre still wielding a ΓÇ£DonΓÇÖt harsh my mellowΓÇ¥ ΓÇÿtude as their idyllic existence is rudely intruded upon (and then some). L. Scott Caldwell, who plays Rose, told me she herself isnΓÇÖt fond of RoseΓÇÖs lack of hospitality, seeing as the fans had come to regard the character as ΓÇ£quite peaceful.ΓÇ¥ So in her mind, R&B ΓÇ£were probably eating wild mushrooms or something else that changed their attitude!ΓÇ¥

So, Juliet/Sawyer ΓÇô happily ever after? Yes? ΓÇô Ryan
Interpret Josh HollowayΓÇÖs assessment of SundayΓÇÖs two-and-a-half hour series finale as you wish: ΓÇ£[It’s] un-freakinΓÇÖ-believableΓǪ Everything I hoped it would do, it did.ΓÇ¥

Source: Fancast